EFFECTS OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY WITH DIFFERENT INTENSITY ON ADULT PATIENTS

Authors

  • Lence Nikolovska Faculty of Medical Sciences, University "Goce Delcev" – Stip, North Macedonia
  • Olgica Gelova Faculty of Medical Sciences, University "Goce Delcev" – Stip, North Macedonia
  • Mire Spasov Faculty of Medical Sciences, University "Goce Delcev" – Stip, North Macedonia

Keywords:

adult, skeletal muscle, physical activity, intensity, well-being, mental health WHO

Abstract

Aging can be defined as a physiological process consisting of a set of permanent physiological changes that occur after adulthood, with the exception of disease-induced changes. Aging tends to be progressive, universal, inevitable and irreversible, although it is currently considered flexible in some respects if an active and balanced lifestyle is followed. The boundary of human life is dictated by the very internal organization of the organism. Physiological age, as opposed to chronological (calendar) age, is defined by the individual ability of the organism to adapt to environmental conditions, usually expressed through endurance, strength, flexibility, coordination and capacity. The World Health Organization (WHO) identifies physical inactivity as the fourth risk factor for overall mortality after high blood pressure, smoking, and high blood sugar. It is estimated that at least 50% of the changes attributable to the aging population of the developed world are due to atrophy as a result of physical inactivity. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of physical activity with different intensity in adult patients
Methods of research: A broad systematic literature search was performed in the databases PubMed, CINAHL, Embase, PEDro and The Cochrane Library. Cross-sectional survey data from 28 European countries were used for the analysis (n = 21 008). Participation intensity was measured with the number of days and minutes of light (walking), moderate and vigorous activity. Another three dummy variables reflected how the WHO guidelines were met. Two-stage least square models were estimated with life satisfaction and subjective well-being SWB (as the dependent variable) - in adults divided into two age groups (18-64; 65+).
Results: For 18- to 64-year-olds, walking and vigorous activity significantly added to subjective well-being SWB Individuals in both age groups meeting the WHO guidelines only for moderate activity and those using a combination of moderate and vigorous activity, both reported significantly higher well-being levels compared with those not meeting the WHO guidelines.
Discusion: High-intensity exercise interventions seem to be somewhat more effective in improving physical functioning than low-intensity exercise interventions. These positive effects are of great value for older adults who are already physically impaired in improving their quality of life. Conclusions: The results show that physical exercise therapy has a positive effect on mobility and physical functioning. High-intensity exercise interventions seem to be somewhat more effective in improving physical functioning than low-intensity exercise interventions. These positive effects are of great value for older adults who are already physically impaired in improving their quality of life.
Physical activity recommendations aiming at improving individuals’ mental health should reconsider the inclusion of light-intensity activity, the inter changeability of moderate and vigorous activity, and the fact that more physical activity does not lead to better outcomes for all intensities and age groups.

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Published

2021-10-07

How to Cite

Nikolovska, L., Gelova, O., & Spasov, M. (2021). EFFECTS OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY WITH DIFFERENT INTENSITY ON ADULT PATIENTS. KNOWLEDGE - International Journal, 48(3), 497–502. Retrieved from https://ikm.mk/ojs/index.php/kij/article/view/4769

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